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BPH Myths and Facts

BPH Myths and Facts

Prostate issues aren’t uncommon in men — but that doesn’t make them any less uncomfortable. Benign prostate hyperplasia is just one of the issues you may experience, causing problems with urination. Although it’s common as you age, it’s not something you have to live with, as there are many successful treatments available.

At NY Urology, with two convenient locations in New York, Dr. David Shusterman and Dr. Chong-Min Kim offer specialized care when you’re dealing with prostate issues. Dr. Shusterman and Dr. Kim are both kidney stone specialists and nephrologists with many years of experience treating urologic problems.

Understanding BPH

The prostate is a small gland that surrounds the urethra. One of its main jobs is to produce the fluid component of ejaculate that helps carry sperm. 

Your prostate is prone to enlargement as you get older. It’s not completely understood what causes BPH, but it could be linked to testosterone levels or changes in your testicles. 

The enlargement of your prostate itself constricts the urethra, causing a number of uncomfortable symptoms, some of which include:

When you have BPH, it also may feel like you can’t ever empty your bladder completely. It also causes you to dribble urine when you’re at the end of your stream. 

All of these symptoms are uncomfortable, and make your life a little more difficult. There are, however, a number of treatments that are able to help.

Just the facts on BPH

When it comes to BPH, there are a lot of myths circulating that make it hard to know the real truth. The team at NY Urology helps you understand the condition, so you’re able to comprehend what’s going on with your body.

The facts are the only aspect of BPH that you should focus on. It’s hard, though, considering the many myths surrounding the condition, which include:

Myth: BPH and cancer are linked

BPH is a benign condition that doesn’t cause cancer. However, the early symptoms of the disease can mimic those of prostate cancer, making it hard to differentiate without a medical evaluation.

Myth: You have to live with the symptoms

The fact is, there’s plenty of lifestyle changes and treatments that help you keep your symptoms at bay. Avoiding caffeine and certain over-the-counter medications helps you avoid the uncomfortable symptoms of BPH.

Myth: It only happens to older men

Prostate problems can occur at any age. While BPH is more common in older men, it can happen to any man at any age.

Myth: The bigger your prostate, the worse it is

This is also not true. You could have a very large prostate with minimal symptoms, while someone else could have a smaller prostate and much worse symptoms.

What are your treatment options?

The treatment for BPH is based on the severity of your symptoms. Dr. Shusterman and Dr. Kim evaluate your symptoms and perform diagnostic testing to determine if BPH is behind your discomfort. 

If BPH is the problem, there are several lifestyle remedies and professional treatments available to help you get rid of your symptoms. At NY Urology, the team offers a number of surgical and non-invasive procedures to help you with BPH symptoms. These treatments include:

Surgical procedures are typically reserved for more severe cases of BPH. If you’re dealing with incontinence, blood in your urine, bladder stones, and chronic urinary tract infections, our team recommends more aggressive treatment to get rid of your symptoms.

If you’re suffering from benign prostate hyperplasia, don’t hesitate to call NY Urology today at 212-991-9991 to schedule an appointment. You can also book on the website using our convenient scheduling tool. 

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